23rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from beatnikdaddio with 6,049 notes

Source: feedtheflies

22nd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from This Must Be The Place with 473 notes

The Last of England — dir. Derek Jarman

22nd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Cinephilia and Beyond with 92 notes

cinephilearchive:

A brief oral history of Jim Jarmusch’s classic ‘Down by Law,’ courtesy of the ever-excellent This Must Be The Place.

Jim Jarmusch: I’m a big blues and R&B fan. I had never been to New Orleans when I wrote the script, but I had a lot of images in my head mostly just from the music of New Orleans. That just kind of drew me there. […] Shooting it was so much fun. Being in New Orleans was great and we had a really wild time. In retrospect I don’t how we got through it—it seemed as if we had a celebration after each night of shooting and I don’t know physically how we got the film made. I tend to see my films in retrospect like home movies—I don’t see the film any more, but I remember the experience of making it. […] For me, in the end of the film I definitely imagine Zack and Jack, and Roberto and Nicoletta, continuing to exist as characters and I really did not want to draw a velvet curtain across the screen and have everything all finished. I wanted these characters to continue to exist out there in the world somehow. [1994/1992/2002]

Robby Müller: In the beginning I didn’t know what form ‘Down by Law’ should have. Then I got the most important directing from [Jim] when I asked him what should I do in this story, because I have no idea what style of photography I should give, and he said, “Well, Robby, it’s just a fairy tale.” And it was really the only direction I got and I was very happy with it because it was not precise, in that sense. So I suddenly felt free and could do what I liked and I felt extremely free there—any invention I did would fit into the film… [Jim] is by far the director I most respect of all that I’ve worked for in my life. I feel that he respects everyone around him, including me. [2002]

Claire Denis: When Jim asked me to work with him, I thought it was a joke, because at the time I was off doing location scouting in Cameroon for Chocolat. But Jim was serious. So I flew halfway across the world from Cameroon to New Orleans to work on ‘Down by Law.’ And there, when I was his AD, he gave me a rabbit’s foot that I kept. I think I did my first film with that rabbit’s foot in my pocket the whole time. And then I lost it when I was in Cannes, and thought, uh-oh, the good luck charm is gone. Maybe I didn’t need it, who knows. […] I think really I was not needed. I think he enjoyed the fact that when he was about to shoot ‘Down by Law,’ it was like a sort of poetic gesture to decide I was going to be the assistant. I was not even allowed by the union so they changed my name or whatever. But I mean I really worked. I was not just invited to watch shooting. I really enjoy working with him, yeah, very much so. And it’s still strong, because he is—I don’t know—we don’t see each other very often, as you might imagine. But it’s important for me to know that he’s working. His work is important for me. [2003/2004]

Roberto Benigni: I met Jim Jarmusch in Italy. I couldn’t talk one single word in English, and he the same in Italian. So we tried to talk with physical, with the body. We immediately love each other, and Jim decided to write this character Bob in ‘Down by Law.’ It was my first time in United States, in Louisiana, in the swamp, with the crocodiles. For me it was a dream, this is such a wonderful memory, such a wonderful souvenir. And what it is very rare, I met also Tom Waits and John Lurie, the musician and the singer, and we are still very close friends. Especially with Jim Jarmusch, every week we call each other, we talk. We are still very, very close friends. [2009]

In case you missed it, here’s a great interview with legendary cinematographer Robby Müller (whose longtime associates include Wim Wenders, Jim Jarmusch, and Lars von Trier) for the Criterion release of ‘Down by Law.’ “Müller says that Jarmusch’s only directions to him were that ‘it’s just like a fairy tale.’ He gets into a lot of meaty technical details regarding his choices in cameras, lenses, lighting, film stock, etc. A real treat for technophiles.” [CinemalsTheLife]

Jim Jarmusch: I loved Robby Müller’s work and I asked Wim Wenders in 1980 how I might meet him. I was going to the Rotterdam Film Festival to show my first film, ‘Permanent Vacation,’ and at that time in Rotterdam the people who visited the festival stayed on a boat that was harboured there, it had a bar in it, and Wim said, ‘Just go on the boat and in the bar next to the peanut machine, Robby Müller will be sitting there.’ So I went to Rotterdam, I went on the boat, I went in the bar, and next to the peanut machine Robby Müller was sitting there. (Laughter) Seriously. So I sat down next to him and started talking to him. And we hung out quite a bit at the festival and he saw my first film, and he said to me eventually, ‘If you ever want to work together man, let me know.’ That was a big thing for me. I made my next film ‘Stranger Than Paradise’ with my friend Tom DiCillo, because Tom was working then as a director of photography, but he really wasn’t interested in shooting films, so when I wrote ‘Down By Law,’ I immediately called Robby Müller.

The beautiful thing about Robby is that he starts the process by talking to you about what the film means, what the story is about, what the characters are about. He starts from the inside out, which is really, really such a great way. I’ve learned that you find the look of the film later after you’ve found the essence of the film, what its atmosphere is, what it’s about and then you look at locations together, you start talking about light and colour, about what film material to use and the general look of the film, and we’ve worked together a lot now, so we don’t have to discuss as many things as other people might because we understand each other. He considers himself to be an artisan in a way. I remember, especially in ‘Dead Man,’ the crew and I were joking a lot by saying, ‘He’s Robby Müller, but don’t tell him that!’ He considers he has a lens, he has film material and he has light. Sometimes crew members would mention some modern piece of equipment, ‘We could do that shot with a lumacrane,’ and Robbie would say, ‘What is a lumacrane?’ I think he’s like a Dutch interior painter, like Vermeer or de Hoeck, who was born in the wrong century. Guardian interviews at the BFI

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

21st April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Cinephilia and Beyond with 82 notes

cinephilearchive:

‘The Long Good Friday’ remains a true (British) classic of the crime film genre, “this movie is one amazing piece of work, not only for the Hoskins performance but also for the energy of the filmmaking, the power of the music, and, oddly enough, for the engaging quality of its sometimes very violent sense of humor.” Roger Ebert

‘Cast and Crew: The Long Good Friday’ brings together John MacKenzie, Barrie Keeffe, Barry Hanson, actor Derek Thompson, casting director Simone Reynolds to discuss the film, its making and its legacy. There are also interviews from Bob Hoskins and Helen Mirren. Watching Keeffe and MacKenzie around a table together, there is still the crackle of creative tension, as writer and director both lay claim to the film’s success. ‘Cast and Crew’: Documentary on the making of the ‘The Long Good Friday’

Written by Barrie Keeffe, a former journalist who made his name writing political drams for TV and theater, ‘Scribes’ (1976), about newspaper workers during a strike, ‘Gimme Shelter’ (1975–7), a powerful trilogy that dealt with deprivation, frustration and anger of working-class youth, and the tremendous BBC drama ‘Waterloo Sunset,’ starring the legendary Queenie Watts. Keeffe wrote ‘The Long Good Friday’ in three days, over an Easter weekend. Originally called ‘The Paddy Factor,’ the story dealt with East End gangster Harold Shand (Bob Hoskins) who plans to go into partnership with the Mafia to redevelop London, only to fall foul of the IRA. The film co-starred Helen Mirren, (who battled to make her character, Victoria, stronger), a young Pierce Brosnan, and Eddie Consantine, as the Mafia don. The script came from all the stories Keeffe heard growing-up and working as a reporter on the Stratford Express, as he told the Arts Desk in 2010. Paul Gallagher, Dangerous Minds

Barrie Keeffe’s screenplay for ‘The Long Good Friday,’ originally called ‘The Paddy Factor.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only.) As always, thanks to the great folks at Write to Reel.

See also: Flashback — ‘The Long Good Friday.’ The DVD and Blu-ray of the film are available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

21st April 2014

Post reblogged from Writer of Screen with 86 notes

Screenwriters read screenplays - Tim Burton edition

writerofscreen:

lifeascaty:

Screenplays for movies directed by Tim Burton

Alice in Wonderland (2010)



Batman (1989)



Batman Returns (1992)



Beetlejuice (1988)



Big Fish (2003)



Ed Wood (1994)



Edward Scissorhands (1990)



Frankenweenie (2012)



Mars Attacks (1996)



Planet of the Apes (2001)



Sleepy Hollow (1999)



Sweeney Todd (2007)



The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993, Caroline Thompson)

@

Source: lifeascaty

21st April 2014

Photoset reblogged from this isn't happiness. with 1,091 notes

nevver:

Some girls wander by mistake, Christine Muraton

21st April 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 6,080 notes

itscolossal:

Transfixing 3D Paper Patterns by Maud Vantours

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from this isn't happiness. with 1,078 notes

nevver:

Blue Monday, Sally Gall

nevver:

Blue Monday, Sally Gall

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from Polygon with 77 notes

polygondotcom:

A list of every video game ever made: 43,806 names, and counting
It’s 43,806 names long, and it’s not even close to being finished.
It’s a project to name every single video game, ever made, for every platform. Pastebin user Data_Baser is leading the project, with help from 4chan’s /vr/ retro games board. And it aims to be comprehensive, including not just arcade, console or PC releases, but video games made for mobile platforms, browser-based games, and visual novels.
So far, the oldest entries are for Computer Space and Galaxy Game (pictured), both class of 1971. Early examples of video games, such as Spacewar! (developed in 1962 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) or Tennis for Two (1958, at Brookhaven National Laboratory) are not in the roll call.
(Link to the full story)

polygondotcom:

A list of every video game ever made: 43,806 names, and counting

It’s 43,806 names long, and it’s not even close to being finished.

It’s a project to name every single video game, ever made, for every platform. Pastebin user Data_Baser is leading the project, with help from 4chan’s /vr/ retro games board. And it aims to be comprehensive, including not just arcade, console or PC releases, but video games made for mobile platforms, browser-based games, and visual novels.

So far, the oldest entries are for Computer Space and Galaxy Game (pictured), both class of 1971. Early examples of video games, such as Spacewar! (developed in 1962 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) or Tennis for Two (1958, at Brookhaven National Laboratory) are not in the roll call.

(Link to the full story)

21st April 2014

Photoset reblogged from this isn't happiness. with 9,513 notes

nevver:

Papercraft, Maud Vantours